Alistair Economakis

Education

Alistair Economakis BUMP

A student of the prestigious and world-renowned Boston University Marine Program (BUMP), Alistair Economakis received his Bachelor’s degree in Marine Biology and Environmental Science from Boston University.  He later went on to pursue his Master’s degree, as well as a Doctorate degree, in Biology. While studying to earn his Ph.D., Alistair Economakis worked closely with established evolutionary ecologist, Les Kaufman.

Alistair Economakis also worked with Ioannis E. Batjakas to develop plans for a public aquarium located in Athens, Greece.  Throughout his academic studies, his work and research were supported and recognized by the Palmer-Mcleod Fellowship, an endowment established to benefit BUMP.

Publications

Throughout his academic pursuits and professional career, Alistair Economakis went on to publish various works regarding his marine biology and ecological studies.

While training with evolutionary ecologist, Les Kaufman, who specializes in the biology and conservation of aquatic ecosystems, Alistair Economakis completed extensive research, which led to the publication of “The Impacts of Behavior and Individual Variation on Resource Utilization Patterns in Fishes” in 2000.

Alistair Economakis The Greek Seashore

Along with Ioannis E. Batjakas, Alistair Economakis co-authored “Coastal Fishes of Greece” (1995) and “The Greek Seashore:  A Field Guide to Coastal Invertebrates” (2002). “The Greek Seashore” is a guide for tourists, fishermen, divers and all nature and environment enthusiasts.  The guide documents an array of marine invertebrates found along the Greek seashore, including over 80 species of water-based wildlife. The publication also includes a variety of colorful and detailed photos and drawings, as well as unique profiles for various marine organisms such as crabs, sea anemones, sponges, and more.

Alistair Economakis also contributed to the following publications:

  • “Aggregations of Gray Reef Sharks, Carcharhinus Amblyrhynchos, and Water Temperature at Johnston Atoll, Mid Pacific Ocean” (1998)
  • “The Impacts of Behavior and Individual Variation on Resource Utilization Patterns in Fishes” (2002)

Shark Aggregation Studies

Working closely with professor of Biology at Boston University, Philip S. Lobel, Alistair Economakis studied contemporary issues in environmental protection and conservation biology, largely focused in the Central Pacific Ocean and the Johnston Atoll.  Together, Alistair Economakis and Philip S. Lobel co-authored “Aggregations of Gray Reef Sharks, Carcharhinus Amblyrhynchos, and Water Temperature at Johnston Atoll, Mid Pacific Ocean” (1998). This publication was featured in a peer-reviewed scientific journal centered around fish-related biology, Environmental Biology of Fishes.  Published in 1998, the data for this publication was gathered from research spanning across three years, from 1992 to 1995.  Together, Philip S. Lobel and Alistair Economakis applied their attention specifically to the movements and aggregation behaviors of free-ranging female gray reef sharks along the shores of the Johnston Atoll in the Central Pacific Ocean.  Their findings uncovered that fluctuations in water temperature and light-level are major factors that correlate with a shark’s movement and aggregation area patterns.

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